Great Central Railway 1940s Weekend June 2012

Before I talk about my visit to the Great Central Railway 1940s weekend, I want to share some good news about two photos that I took at this event in 2010.  I recently entered these two image in the Great Central Railway Print section of the annual exhibition run by Leicester and Leicestershire Photographic Society.

This picture of an engine driver looking out of his cab was commended:

“Engine Driver British Railways” Great Central Railway 2010

This picture featuring a young soldier and a beautiful land army girl, which was a grab shot taken as a steam train was drawing into Rothley Station, was awarded second place in the same competition:

“Young Lovers In Wartime” Great Central Railway 2010

This year (2012) was the fifth time that my good friend Barry and I have photographed this event in the last 6 years.  Not only is it a great event for photographers, but it is a great day out with plenty to see and enjoy, good food and interesting people to meet and share experiences.

Members of the Pitsford Home Guard Living History Unit at Quorn and Woodhouse Station, Great Central Railway 2012

The weather turned out so much better than expected with the forecast for Sunday being wet and windy.  As it turned out, it was a beautiful day for re-enactors and visitors alike.

A British Spy attempts to escape by running along the railway track – Great Central Railway 2012

I don’t think there were quite as many period costume “characters” as there were last year but there was still plenty going on, certainly on the Sunday when we were there.  The Das Heer re-enactment group were on patrol at Rothley Station as in previous years.

A member of Das Heer Living History Re-enactment Group fires a warning shot – Great Central Railway 2012

At Quorn and Loughborough Stations we encountered the Pitsford Home Guard Living History Group who carried out various exercises, parades and drills throughout the weekend.  There was also a rarade featuring members of the Royal British Legion and guest dignitaries including Montgomery among others.

Members of the Pitsford Home Guard Living History Unit on patrol at Loughborough Station – Great Central Railway 2012

This was my first re-enactment of the year following a long lay-off due to my back problem earlier in the year.  It was great to be out taking photos again and I hope to be able to cover more events through the remainder of the year now that my back is improving.

Standard Bearers of the Royal British Legion at Quorn and Woodhouse Station – Great Central Railway 2012

All the photos here were taken with my Canon EOS 5D (Classic) and EF 80-200mm F2.8L lens.  All photos were shot in RAW format and processed using Lightroom Version 3.6.  I’m still using Windows XP and so I am unable to upgrade to the latest version of Lightroom but to be honest it doesn’t concern me that much.

Loughborough Station in the 1940s – I love the shadow pattern being projected onto the carriages by the platform canopy – Great Central Railway 2012

As always, credit must go to the event organisers, especially everyone connected with the Great Central Railway, including all the volunteers.

A Well-Dressed Professional 1940s Style – Great Central Railway 2012

Also thanks to all the living history groups and re-enactors, both military and civilian, who make these events such a great photo opportunity for the many enthusiast photographers like myself.

Geoff

Tough Mudder UK South-East/Midlands, Boughton House, Northamptonshire 12th May 2012

Finally, a new blog post – my first since January.  I’m going to start with a confession:  Up until the week before this event, I had never heard of Tough Mudder and didn’t know anything about this type of event.

Tough Mudder – Leaving the Fire Walker – Boughton House, Northamptonshire, UK

It was my friend Janet who introduced me to the world that is Tough Mudder.  A friend and colleague of hers, Marianne, was taking part in the event and Janet wanted to go along to offer support and hopefully take some photos at the same time.  After doing some research on the event website, Janet thought that it would appeal to me as a photographic opportunity, and duly sent me the link.

Delight at seeing a familiar face – Tough Mudder “Fire Walker”, Boughton House, Northamptonshire, UK

As it happened, I also knew someone taking part in event, though I didn’t know it beforehand.  A colleague from work, Joe, spotted me on the approach to the Hay Bale Pyramid, one of the early obstacles.  I also managed to photograph him jumping a ditch a little later, but then all but missed him running through the Firewalker.  With hindsight, I would love to have caught him at the mud mile as I would have got a lot more photos at that location.  Maybe next time…

My work colleague Joe at the base of the Hay Bale Pyramid – Tough Mudder, Boughton House, Northamptonshire, UK

It turned out that this particular event, held at Boughton House, near Kettering in Northamptonshire was the very first Tough Mudder event to take place in the UK, following enormous success in the USA and other countries worldwide.  So what is Tough Mudder all about?  In essence, the event consists of a twelve-mile run across country with an obstacle to overcome roughly every half mile or so.

The Funkey Monkey – Tough Mudder, Boughton House

The obstacles varied in their difficulty and their level of sadism.  Some, like the Berlin Walls and Hay Bale Pyramid, provided a physical barrier to scale and overcome.  Others, like the Mud Mile and Log Bog Jog were designed to sap the energy out of the competitors and test their stamina…

The “Mud Mile” – Tough Mudder, Boughton House, Northamptonshire, UK

Other obstacles such the Funkey Monkey and Walk the Plank tested the physical capabilities of the runners in respect of their strength, balance and agility.  As for the Electro-Shock Therapy, well you can make your own mind up about that one…

Electro-Shock Therapy – 10,000 volts of Shock Treatment – Tough Mudder

Many of the obstacles are designed with teamwork in mind, none more so than the Everest Wall, the last but one obstacle consisting of a quarter-pipe roughly 12 feet high which proved to be almost impossible to scale single-handed but turned into an object lesson in using team-work and camaraderie to overcome the seemingly insurmountable.

It’s all about working together to reach the top of Everest – Tough Mudder, Boughton House

It is this sense of teamwork that sets Tough Mudder apart from many similar types of event such as Tough Guy.  Tough Mudder is not a race as such, it is a challenge above all else, both a personal challenge and a team challenge.  Add to this mix lots of mud and the fact that most of the entrants were also raising large amounts of money for good causes at the same time and you have the reasons why this has become such a successful format.

Happy as Mudders in Mud! – Tough Mudder , Boughton House, Northamptonshire UK

As a photographic opportunity, this was a great event for me and just what I needed after a long lay-off suffering from back muscle spasms.  With hindsight, I probably missed some of the very best obstacles in terms of facial expressions, the Arctic Enema and the Spiders Web for instance.  However, this was the first time I had tried to photograph an event like this and I think I did ok for a first attempt.

The Boa Constrictor – Tough Mudder, Boughton House

In truth, I did not know what to expect in terms of spectator access to the obstacles, which was actually much better than I imagined.  Because of this uncertainty, I decided to take my old but trusty Canon EF55-200mm F4-5.6 zoom.  This is a great lens for the money but doesn’t quite give that 3D effect that my regular EF80-200mm F2.8 would have given.  All shots were taken with my EOS 5D (or 5D Classic as it is referred to now).  One equipment decision I was pleased with was footwear.  Janet and I both chose to wear our wellies and we were both very glad that we did!

Walk The Plank – Tough Mudder, Boughton House, Kettering

One thing I wasn’t prepared for was the sheer number of competitors taking part.  8,000 runners took part on the Saturday when we attended, and another 5,000 on the Sunday.  Any attempt to photograph all those taking part was clearly futile.  Even the official event photographers who had cameras located at various locations around the course struggled to get shots of everyone taking part.

Waiting to tackle the big one – Everest! Tough Mudder, Boughton House, Kettering

Janet and I had a great day out photographing this event.  Not just because it was a beautiful day weather wise but because it was such a great event both to witness and to photograph.  There were times, especially at the “Everest” wall when I had to stop taking photos just to enjoy and appreciate the unbelievable effort that the competitors were making in order to complete the challenge.

A desperate lunge for a pair of grasping hands, Everest, Tough Mudder, Boughton House, Kettering, Northamptonshire, UK

We both left Boughton House full of respect and admiration for everyone who takes part in these events.  The levels of commitment, dedication and teamwork were clear for all to see.  Now that my eyes have been opened to this type of event, I very much hope to be able to cover more of them later in the year, hopefully in Scotland on the 14th and 15th July, and at Cholmondeley Castle in the North West on the 17th and 18th November.

Tough Mudder 73848 in the “Mud Mile”, Boughton House, Northamptonshire, UK – May 2012

Here’s a link to the rest of the photos I took on the day:  http://geoffoliverphotography.co.uk/toughmudder2012

Tough Mudder 71478 demonstrating one way to get noticed, Boughton House, Northamptonshire, UK, May 2012

***Update – July 2012***  for any runners still looking for photos from the South-East/Midlands event at Boughton House, I have now tagged all my photos from the day with your running numbers where they were visible.  Use the search function below to quickly check if I managed to tag your number (Saturday 12th May only):

http://geoffoliverphotography.co.uk/search.html

Geoff

%d bloggers like this: